Collaborations

About 5 results

GSK will be sharing its Tres Cantos Anti-Malarial Set (TCAMS) compound library with Drs. Audrey Odom John and Paul Hruz at WUSTL for screening for antimalarial drug discovery.

TCAMS, developed as a component of GSK’s research at its Tres Cantos facility, is a diverse set of over 13,500 compounds with activity against blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum, plus associated screening data. GSK shares the TCAMS compounds and data widely to drive antimalarial drug discovery.

Dr. Audrey Odom John (Washington University in St. Louis) and Dr. Cynthia Dowd (The George Washington University) identified an antimalarial drug candidate with a novel, parasite-specific target. The investigators have explored various solutions to improve the compound’s pharmacokinetic properties, including administration in a patch formulation. BVGH coordinated a call between Dr. Odom John, Dr. Dowd, and a Pfizer scientist with expertise in transdermal drug delivery to help assess the feasibility of this approach for the compound.

A Pfizer scientist with expertise in transdermal drug delivery shared advice on the feasibility of a transdermal delivery for the investigators’ antimalarial drug candidate and helped suggest next steps for development.

Johnson & Johnson has provided Drs. Audrey Odom John and Paul Hruz at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) with its Jump-stARter library to screen against Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly species of malaria parasite. Drs. Odom John and Hruz have developed a novel platform to selectively screen compounds’ ability to inhibit parasite glucose transport.

Johnson & Johnson Research & Development will provide a Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) researcher with its Jump-stARter library to screen against a Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme demonstrated to be essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium.

Drs. Meyers and Wildman were interested in the potential of PDE inhibitors to target a specific protein of interest in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). BVGH connected them with Dr. Pollastri, who had synthesized a set of PDE inhibitors as potential new drugs for HAT. Dr. Pollastri shared the structures of his compounds with Drs. Meyers and Wildman, who performed virtual docking studies to predict whether the inhibitors might have activity against MTb.