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Professor James (Jim) Heath leads a laboratory where one group’s research is in the area of solid-state quantum physics, materials science, and basic surface science, while another group focuses on fundamental biology and translational medicine. On the biology and translational medical side, Heath's group has developed a number of microchip based platforms for highly multiplex analysis of functional proteins from single cells and blood, with specific applications to immune monitoring and tissue analysis, and with a medical focus on oncology. His group also has expertise in creating artificial antibodies that share the high affinity and selectivity of monoclonal antibodies, but maintain the stability of short peptides. They are developing chemistries for targeting these peptides at specific protein epitopes. The superior stability of these capture agents has possible advantages in diagnostic applications for immunoassays, as well as in vivo (imaging and therapeutic) applications. This could potentially be of interest to organizations like PATH and IDRI working on diagnostics especially antibody diagnostics. This might enable the diagnostic to be more stable for developing world applications. So it would be that organizations would know there is a resource or a person with expertise in developing more stable antibodies and could approach to see if there is interest in a collaboration or just sharing of know how.

Professor Brian Stoltz leads a laboratory that is interested in the general area of chemical synthesis with a focus on the development of new strategies for the preparation of complex molecules possessing interesting structural, biological, and physical properties. Recently, the group has pioneered a new method for making nitrogen containing heterocycles. This expertise can be applied to NTD research by development of cheaper and more efficient routes for synthesis of natural products and other biologically active lead compounds.
Expertise and knowhow in the general area of chemical synthesis with a focus on the development of new strategies for the preparation of complex molecules possessing interesting structural, biological, and physical properties. Recently, the group has pioneered a new method for making nitrogen containing heterocycles. This expertise can be applied to NTD research by development of cheaper and more efficient routes for synthesis of natural products and other biologically active lead compounds.

Professor Axel Scherer leads a laboratory primarily interested in the design, fabrication, and characterization of nanoscale photonic, magnetic, and fluidic devices and systems. His group has expertise in designing microfluidic systems and electronic and optical sensors for low cost PCR devices for point of care diagnostics. This expertise is applicable to the development of diagnostics for neglected tropical diseases in the developing world.