Collaborations

About 12 results

Johnson & Johnson is sharing its Jump-stARter library with Dr. Peter Myler at Seattle Children’s Research Institute (SCRI) for screening for leishmaniasis drug discovery. Under the umbrella of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease, SCRI is partnering with the University of Washington’s Dr. Wes Van Voorhis to carry out the screening.

Approximately 11,000 people per month die, and approximately 450,000 people per year suffer life-altering injuries such as amputation and permanent disability, due to snakebite envenoming. Professor Nicholas Casewell, a Wellcome Trust research fellow at the Centre of Snakebite Research and Interventions (CSRI), Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, is working on innovative approaches to discover and develop the next generation of treatments for snakebites. To support these efforts, Johnson & Johnson will be sharing its diverse compound library and a targeted set of compounds to potentially identify novel inhibitors of the toxic components of snake venom.

Parasitic worms cause substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide, and a heavy reliance on anti-parasitic treatments has led to drug resistance, with no effective vaccine available for most parasites. In order to address this high priority gap, the team of Professor Robin Gasser at the University of Melbourne has developed a high throughput whole-organism assay for anthelmintic drug discovery. Johnson & Johnson will provide its Jump-stARter library for screening in the assay.

Johnson & Johnson will be sharing a phenotypic screening library with Dr. Lawal Bilbis at UDUS for screening for antimalarial drug discovery.

Johnson & Johnson has provided Drs. Audrey Odom John and Paul Hruz at Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) with its Jump-stARter library to screen against Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly species of malaria parasite. Drs. Odom John and Hruz have developed a novel platform to selectively screen compounds’ ability to inhibit parasite glucose transport.

Johnson & Johnson Research & Development will provide a Washington University in St. Louis (WUSTL) researcher with its Jump-stARter library to screen against a Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme demonstrated to be essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium.

Johnson & Johnson Research & Development will provide National Institutes of Health researchers with its Jump-stARter library to screen against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vitro under conditions that mimic important aspects of human pathogenesis.

Johnson & Johnson Research & Development will provide WEHI researchers with its Jump-stARter library to screen against P. falciparum in vitro.

Johnson & Johnson Research & Development will provide a University of Toronto researcher with its Jump-stARter library. The researcher will screen the library against C. elegans to identify inhibitors of a unique metabolic pathway found in parasitic worms.

An investigator at the University of Yaoundé I, Cameroon is working to identify hit inhibitors of critical parasitic metabolic pathways to develop high-need drugs against HAT, leishmaniasis, and malaria. To support these efforts, Johnson & Johnson R&D’s computer-aided design team conducted analysis to select the best compounds for this collaboration and will be sharing the selected compounds with the University of Yaoundé I investigator.