Collaborations

About 9 results

A UBC researcher will utilize his phage-display technology to develop new antibodies against Chagas disease host biomarkers identified by a McGill University researcher. Once developed, the antibody will be incorporated into the development of a diagnostic.

A Northeastern University researcher synthesized an inhibitor previously demonstrated by a McGill researcher to inhibit malaria parasites. The McGill researcher utilized the compound to repeat his in vivo screens.

Dr. Dent (McGill University) had optimized C. elegans as a model system to screen compounds for potential activity against STH. BVGH facilitated a collaboration between Dr. Dent and AstraZeneca, which provided a large compound library for screening. Dr. Dent screened the compounds, and was additionally awarded a travel grant to meet with his collaborators at AstraZeneca’s high-throughput screening facility in the United Kingdom.

Dr. Dent at McGill University had developed C. elegans models of STH, which included mutant strains resistant to common anti-helmint drugs. AstraZeneca and DNDi were interested in determining whether their hits from a phenotypic Onchocerca screen targeted established or novel pathways in helminths. AstraZeneca shared their hits with Dr. Dent, who screened the compounds in his C. elegans model.

Dr. Gros studied cerebral malaria (CM). CM is the most severe neurological complication of a Plasmodium falciparum infection, resulting in seizures, coma, and death. CM is characterized by severe inflammation in the brain, and it is this inflammation that makes the disease invariably lethal. Anti-inflammatory compounds may help to prevent this inflammation-associated brain damage. Janus kinase 3 (JAK-3) is a key enzyme in an important inflammation-signaling pathway, and thus inhibiting JAK-3 could inhibit cerebral inflammation. BVGH connected Dr. Gros with Pfizer, which shared a JAK-3 inhibitor with suitable characteristics for testing in Dr. Gros’ CM animal model.

A McGill University researcher provided a UBC researcher with frozen cell extracts of Cryptosporidium infected cells. The UBC researcher used these extracts to identify potential antigens for use in a vaccine.

A University of Lagos researcher will provide a McGill University researcher with blood samples from Malaria patients with varying levels of parasitemia. The McGill researcher will use the blood to evaluate the sensitivity of a Malaria diagnostic that he is developing.

A UBC researcher will utilize his phage-display technology to develop new antibodies against Chagas disease host biomarkers identified by a McGill University researcher. Once developed, the antibody will be incorporated into the development of a diagnostic.

A McGill University researcher will provide a UBC researcher with frozen cell extracts of T. cruzi infected cells. The UBC researcher will use these extracts to identify potential antigens for use in a vaccine.