Re:Search Institution Members

160 Results for Members

Members

The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) is a private university with a strong focus on science and...

The Centre Pasteur du Cameroun was created in 1959 in partnership with the Institut de Recherche pour le...

Cheikh Anta Diop University of Dakar (UCAD), was originally established as a medical school. Research at UCAD...

The Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology is focused on advancing basic and applied research related to...

Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, also known as Fiocruz, focuses on research and experimental medicine aimed at...

Guangzhou Institutes of Biomedicine and Health (GIBH) was established in 2006 as a joint venture between the...

171 Results for Collaborations

Collaborations

Dr. Pollastri is a medicinal chemist specializing in drugs for neglected tropical diseases. He designed over 1,000 compounds that could inhibit HAT, but it was unclear whether the compounds would possess ADME properties sufficient to ensure good in vivo exposure. BVGH connected Dr. Pollastri with AstraZeneca, who agreed to test compounds from the Northeastern optimization efforts in their TIER1 ADME assays.

60P Pharmaceuticals, a company that specializes in drug development for tropical diseases, was interested in repurposing modipafant for treating dengue fever. Modipafant was under development by Pfizer, but was discontinued. Pfizer disclosed modipafant’s Investigator’s Brochure to 60P under confidentiality. An Investigator's Brochure is a compilation of the clinical and nonclinical data on the investigational product(s) that is relevant to the study of the investigational product(s) in human subjects. The data helped 60P design its dengue fever clinical trial, saving both time and money.

PLKs are important regulators of cell cycle progression and mitosis. In mammals there are five PLKs (PLK 1-5). SmPLK1 and SmSAK —homologous to PLK1 and PLK4, respectively— are expressed in the parasitic worm Schistosoma mansoni. Dr. Caffrey has evidence from whole-organism screens that specific inhibition of SmPLK1 by commercially available inhibitors of human PLK1 kills S. mansoni. GSK provided Dr. Caffrey with 38 benzimidazole thiophene inhibitors of human PLK1 from the Published Kinase Inhibitor Sets (PKIS) 1 and 2, which he screened for anti-schistosomal activity.

Dr. Hoffmann’s laboratory used gene knockdown studies to identify drug targets of clinical importance in S. mansoni, the causative agent of schistosomiasis. Alnylam researchers designed siRNAs for Dr. Hoffmann that were specially optimized for delivery in S. mansoni, and also provided expert guidance on their use.

PATH provided its NINA heater to support Dr. Pillai’s loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP)-based malaria diagnostic. Dr. Pillai tested his pan-Plasmodium/Plasmodium falciparum-specific LAMP assay with the NINA heater, first in his laboratory at the University of Calgary and then in the field in Ethiopia. LAMP amplified DNA / RNA with specificity and rapidity under isothermal conditions. The method uses DNA polymerase and primers recognizing gene sequences that target the parasitic mtDNA, detecting parasitaemia below the limit of microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests. LAMP carried out in a NINA heater was rapid and simple. Results were read by visual observation of the reaction, with no additional processing. NINA-LAMP has demonstrated success in point-of-care diagnosis of malaria:
• Evaluation of non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (NINA-LAMP) for the diagnosis of malaria in Northwest Ethiopia (2015); https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4323137/
• NINA-LAMP compared to microscopy, RDT, and nested PCR for the detection of imported malaria (2016); https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4862928/

Dr. Ayong developed a reverse transcription-loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based assay (RT-LAMP) for high sensitivity detection of malaria parasites. In order to meet the necessary temperature conditions for field use of the RT-LAMP assay, BVGH connected Dr. Ayong with PATH scientists, who shared their NINA heater to support diagnostic development. Dr. Ayong’s tests of his RT-LAMP in the NINA heater yielded encouraging results, which he, along with the PATH team, published in 2016. The RT-LAMP method uses primers designed to target a high-abundant P. falciparum transcript in parasite RNA extracts or whole blood lysates. Following amplification within the NINA heater platform, the results are read using a UV light source (flashlight) to detect sample fluorescence. The RT-LAMP-assay has demonstrated success for malaria diagnosis in both low and high parasite density settings: A Field-Tailored Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Assay for High Sensitivity Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Infections (2016) (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27824866)

171 Results for Assets

Assets

Professor Brian Stoltz leads a laboratory that is interested in the general area of chemical synthesis with a focus on the development of new strategies for the preparation of complex molecules possessing interesting structural, biological, and physical properties. Recently, the group has pioneered a new method for making nitrogen containing heterocycles. This expertise can be applied to NTD research by development of cheaper and more efficient routes for synthesis of natural products and other biologically active lead compounds. Expertise and knowhow in the general area of chemical synthesis with a focus on the development of new strategies for the preparation of complex molecules possessing interesting structural, biological, and physical properties. Recently, the group has pioneered a new method for making nitrogen containing heterocycles. This expertise can be applied to NTD research by development of cheaper and more efficient routes for synthesis of natural products and other biologically active lead compounds.
Professor Axel Scherer leads a laboratory primarily interested in the design, fabrication, and characterization of nanoscale photonic, magnetic, and fluidic devices and systems. His group has expertise in designing microfluidic systems and electronic and optical sensors for low cost PCR devices for point of care diagnostics. This expertise is applicable to the development of diagnostics for neglected tropical diseases in the developing world.
Researchers at the University of South Florida are seeking partners to license their development of novel nanoparticles for the protection, rejuvenation, and delivery of antibiotic drugs. Potential applications include cosmetics, implant coatings, eye washes, and treatment of topical and systemic bacterial infections. The delivery of antibacterial agents to infection sites within the human body is a challenge particularly for lipophilic drugs and for accessing deadly infections in fatty tissue and on the surface of surgically-implanted medical devices. The need to overcome this challenge is of high priority in the development of new antibacterial therapeutics for treatment of life-threatening infectious diseases and medical device implant technologies. These nanoparticles specifically address this problem and demonstrate the means to enhance biological performance of both water insoluble and water soluble drugs, by targeting bacterial cells and avoiding rapid degradation of antibiotic compounds in the human body. This methodology implements microemulsion polymerization as a means to easily prepare aqueous solutions of polyacrylate nanoparticles that contain antibacterial drugs either chemically bonded to the nanoparticle matrix or encapsulated within its protective core structure. The resulting nanoparticle antibiotics, or nanobiotics, are morphologically consistent and enhance the bioactivity of the antibiotics so that they are highly effective, even against drug resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This methodology has been further utilized by the researchers to prepare "surfactant-free" nanoparticles as well as nanoparticle delivery vehicles for antimalarial drugs and drug-reversal agents. -Enhances the bioactivity of water-soluble and water-insoluble antibiotics. -Converts water-insoluble compounds into aqueous solutions of nanoparticles for easy administration. -Effective against microbes such as MRSA that cause life threatening and drug resistant bacterial infections. -Provides a delivery platform for a wide variety of drug classes, including anti-malarial drugs and drug-resistant reversal agents. -Biocompatible with biological fluids and tissue. -Nanoparticles target bacterial cells.
Researchers at the University of South Florida seek partners to license their compound which has displayed potent anti-malarial activity as well as improved chemical resistance against multi-drug resistant (MDR) parasites. The invention described is a 4(1H)-quinolone structure that has shown anti-malarial activity at concentrations as low as 0.15nM against the MDR Plasmodium falciparum. This invention promises a great approach to treat those affected with malaria. The compound possesses a potent EC50 against multidrug resistant malarial strains W2 (chloroquine and pyrimethamine resistant) and TM90-C2B (chloroquine, mefloquine, pyrimethamine, and atovaquone resistant). This compound also exhibits signs of reduced chemical resistance. -Potent anti-malarial activity -Improved chemical resistance against multi-drug resistant MDR parasites -Acts on both MDR parasites and drug susceptible anti-malarial strains equally well
Researchers at the University of South Florida seek partners to license their novel synthetic vaccine based on the ligand domain of Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein. Parasite invasion of human erythrocytes is necessary for asexual blood stage development of Plasmodium vivax. The Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) is an essential ligand for parasite invasion of erythrocytes, making the molecule an attractive vaccine candidate against vivax malaria. However, allelic variation in the ligand domain represents a potential challenge, which may compromise vaccine efficacy by eliciting an immune response that is biased towards strain-specificity. To overcome this inherent bias, USF researchers have designed a novel DBP based vaccine that would elicit antibodies with functional activity against broader allelic variants and favor boosting responses against conserved protective epitopes. This invention is important for the development of an effective vivax malaria vaccine that target diverse P.vivax strains.
The Donald Price Center for Parasite Repository and Education is directed by Prof. Ricardo Izurieta. The center provides access to special educational materials on parasites, including sources of infective stages and modes of transmission of endoparasites. Materials in the parasite repository include 1. Fecal specimens positive for a variety of parasites 2. Specimens of whole parasites 3. Microscope slides: a. wet preparations prepared from preserved specimens b. stained fecal smears c. stained blood films d. stained tissue sections showing pathology e. whole-mounts of parasites or stages of parasites The Center responds to requests from organizations needing in house training as well as research collaboration with other institutions.