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The present invention is related to a viral vaccine against rabies and use of the virus for producing rabiesvirus immunobiologicals. More particularly, the present invention is related to a genetically engineered plasmid vector that has been used to construct a unique vaccinia poxvirus infectious recombinant for expressing in animals or in tissue cultures part or all of the gene for rabiesvirus glycoprotein. Such a recombinant employing vaccinia or other poxviruses, could be used for production of rabies vaccine, live or inactivated, as well as for production of rabiesvirus glycoprotein antigen, antibody or other related biochemical or immunological reagents.
The invention relates to the design and synthesis of linear and cyclic inhibitors of cathepsin D and plasmepsins I and II. The present invention also relates to the uses of these inhibitors for inhibiting invasion and metastasis of cancerous cells. It also covers the use of cathepsin D and plasmepsin I and II inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and malaria. NIH Internal Reference no E-221-1994/0-US-01; US Patent Application no 08/603,737; E-221-1994/0-AU-03; AU Patent Application no 21368/97;E-221-1994/0-CA-04; CA Patent Application no 2246758; E-221-1994/0-EP-05; EP Patent Application no 97906763.4; E-221-1994/0-JP-06; JP Patent Application no 9-529609; The invention relates to the design and synthesis of linear and cyclic inhibitors of cathepsin D and plasmepsins I and II. The present invention also relates to the uses of these inhibitors for inhibiting invasion and metastasis of cancerous cells. It also covers the use of cathepsin D and plasmepsin I and II inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease and malaria.
The present invention relates to DNA sequences encoding merozoite antigen proteins of simian or simian-like species of Plasmodium suitable for use as vaccines against malarial infections in humans and animals. The invention also relates to recombinant DNA molecules that include such sequences and to cells transformed therewith.
The technology describes an exceptionally broad universe of novel naphthylisoquinoline alkaloid compounds, and methods of total synthesis thereof. These compounds have been shown to have potent in vitro activity against malaria parasites, including parasites that are highly resistant to available antimalarial drugs. These compounds have also been shown to have potent in vivo activity against malaria parasites in animal models. Pharmaceutical compositions comprising these compounds, as well as methods of using the compounds to treat or prevent a malarial infection of a host, are claimed. NIH Internal Reference no E-200-1994/0-US-01, US Patent Application no 08/279,291, US Patent no 5,552,550; E-200-1994/0-US-02, US Patent Application no 08/674,362, US Patent no 5,763,613; E-200-1994/2-US-01, US Patent Application no 09/001,801, US Patent no 6,140,339; E-200-1994/2-US-08, US Patent Application no 09/527,002, US Patent no 6,331,630; E-200-1994/2-AU-04, AU Patent Application no 24496/99; E-200-1994/2-BR-05, BR Patent Application no 9814575-4; E-200-1994/2-CA-06, CA Patent Application no 2313487; E-200-1994/2-EP-07, EP Patent Application no 98966748.0, EP Patent no 1045837; E-200-1994/2-IN-03, IN Patent Application no 2000/00143/CHE; E-200-1994/1-AU-02, AU Patent Application no 31969/95, AU Patent no 709428; E-200-1994/1-CA-03, CA Patent Application no 2195647; E-200-1994/1-JP-05, JP Patent Application no 505844/1996; E-200-1994/1-EP-06, EP Patent Application no 03005979.4; follwoing EP patents share same EP Patent Application no 95928091.8 and same EP Patent no 0772595: E-200-1994/1-EP-04, E-200-1994/1-AT-07, E-200-1994/1-DE-08, E-200-1994/1-BE-09, E-200-1994/1-DK-10, E-200-1994/1-ES-11, E-200-1994/1-GR-12, E-200-1994/1-IT-13, E-200-1994/1-LU-14, E-200-1994/1-MC-15, E-200-1994/1-NL-16, E-200-1994/1-PT-17, E-200-1994/1-SE-18, E-200-1994/1-FR-19. The technology describes an exceptionally broad universe of novel naphthylisoquinoline alkaloid compounds, and methods of total synthesis thereof. These compounds have been shown to have potent in vitro activity against malaria parasites, including parasites that are highly resistant to available antimalarial drugs. These compounds have also been shown to have potent in vivo activity against malaria parasites in animal models. Pharmaceutical compositions comprising these compounds, as well as methods of using the compounds to treat or prevent a malarial infection of a host, are claimed.
The subject technology are novel naphthylisoquinoline alkaloid compounds, and methods of total synthesis thereof. Representative examples of these compounds have been shown to have potent in vitro activity against malaria parasites, including parasites that are highly resistant to available antimalarial drugs. Representative examples have also been shown to have potent in vivo activity against malaria parasites in animal models. Pharmaceutical compositions comprising these compounds, as well as methods of using the compounds to treat or prevent a malarial infection of a host, are claimed. The relative structural simplicity of this class of compounds, and the ready synthetic access thereto, provide unprecedented opportunities for structure-activity relationship (SAR), lead-optimization and antimalarial drug development.
Malaria is endemic in many parts of the world, particularly in tropical regions such as Asia, Central America and South America. Recent estimates of the number of cases of malaria worldwide are between five hundred million and one billion. There are approximately two to three hundred million new cases of malaria each year and malaria causes a minimum of one million deaths each year. This invention relates to the identification and characterization of the binding specificity of BAEBL, a novel Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding ligand that interacts with human erythrocytes in a sialic acid dependent manner. This novel Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding ligand is unique and quite distinct from previously described Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding proteins EBA-175. BAEBL may be used as a malaria vaccine to block human red cell recognition and invasion.